Posts

Reading Notes: Robin Hood, Part B

Image
Robin Hood is in disguise once again, this time as a shepherd. Barnsdale is a real place in South Yorkshire, England, and its association with the Robin Hood legend is one of its claims to fame. To disguise himself as a beggar, Little John needs "palmer's weed." The word " palmer " refers to a pilgrim who had visited the holy places of the Middle East and brought back a palm leaf as a token of the pilgrimage. Meanwhile, the word "weed" here refers to clothing, as in the phrase "widow's weeds." The word comes from the Old English waed, meaning "garment." You will also see the word "carel" (carril, carl) in this ballad, which means a low-born person. Bibliography:  The English and Scottish Popular Ballads  by Francis James Child (1882-1898). ( Little John )

Reading Notes: Robin Hood, Part A

Image
Story source: The English and Scottish Popular Ballads by Francis James Child (1882-1898). Robin meets the mother of three poachers, and in order to rescue them, Robin once again disguises himself, this time as a beggar, paying a beggar an extravagant amount of money (forty shillings) to take his place. There are many different versions of this story; in some the boys are brothers (as here), while in other stories they are members of Robin Hood's own band of Merry Men.  ( Statue )

Week 12 Story: The Gummybear

Image
( Gummy bears ) Momma Gummy Bear told her kids that she would be home soon. She was taking a trip sugar store for some food. She locked the door as always and started down the road. All the sudden Hard Candy Bear attacked Momma Gummy Bear. Hard Candy Bear was hungry and devoured her piece by piece until she was gone. Hard Gummy Bear walked back to the house to try to eat her kids.  There was a knock at the door. The kids looked at each other in confusion. Momma Gummy bear told them not to answer the door for anyone until she was gone. They yelled out "Who is it?"  "It's me! Momma! I need to grab something real quick and my hands are full" said Hard Gummy Bear in his highest voice.  The kids looked at each other and immediately knew that it was not their mom and they were in trouble. "Oh nevermind! I'll open the door if you guys won't". Hard Candy Bear had knocked the door clean open. He made the kids take care of him while he was impersonating

Reading Notes: Aesop's Fables: Dogs, Part B

Image
 These works were shorter of that to the Fox stories I previously read. The stanzas are shorter, but they still rhyme like the Fox section. I chose dogs as opposed to the other animal choices because I am a sucker for dogs. The stories reminded me of the saying "a dog is a man's best friend". These stories reminded me of specific people that I've met or characters in TV.  ( illustration from Baby's Book of Fables ) Bibliography:  The Fables of Phaedrus , translated by Christopher Smart (1887).

Reading Notes: Aesop's Fables: Foxes, Part A

Image
 I like how all of these stories rhyme as they are formatted in a poem. It's very creative and I don't think I could personally do it. In the first story the fox which in normal stories is the trickster is outwitted by another animal. This was a nice twist on a traditional story than what I have read for this class previously. The last story, however, brings it back home where the fox is a trickster to a goat. Goats are traditionally viewed as a very intelligent animal so this was a bit surprising, but still within character.  I noticed with some rhyming patterns that they were the same from each stanza which is impressive.  ( illustration from Baby's Book of Fables ) Bibliography:  The Fables of Phaedrus , translated by Christopher Smart (1887).

Reading Notes: The Rabbit Goes Duck Hunting, Part A

Image
The rabbit used to boast about things that he could do. One day he lied about being a carnivore to an otter. He got trapped in a hole because he messed up during his attempt to trap an animal. He was starving for a couple days, until a family heard him. He called over to them to observe and admire him. They made the whole bigger and he jumped away.  (A Rabbit by  Pixabay ) Bibliography: "The Rabbit Goes Duck Hunting"  Myths of the Cherokee by James Mooney (1900).

Reading Notes: The Little Hunting Dog, Part B

Image
This story had a scholar who didn't like to live with anyone. He witnessed a tiny little kingdom which in my head represented buggs because they were only a couple of inches if that tall. When they all disappeared, they left a little hunting dog. I think the scholar had become fond of the dog, but the dog died. I was so sad when the dog died. I love dogs. However, the dog died protecting the scholar while he slept which makes me even sadder.  ( Rover ) Bibliography: The Chinese Fairy Book , ed. by R. Wilhelm and translated by Frederick H. Martens (1921).